Captured Weapons

Marines Deliver Captured Weapons to Iraqi Forces

CAMP TAJI, Iraq – Marines with the 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), delivered roughly 900 captured enemy weapons to the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, July 28.

This was one in a series of transfers that have taken place since 2004 under an agreement requiring enemy weapons captured by the U.S. military to be turned over to the Iraqi government for future use by the Iraqi army and Iraqi police.

Only weapons authorized for Iraqi military or police use are issued. Looking at the photos, it’s clear that a wide range of gear shows up:

Marines with Engineer Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Maintenance Company, 2nd Supply Battalion Reinforced, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), sort captured enemy weapons at the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, July 28. The depot is responsible for destroying unserviceable weapons and turning over serviceable weapons to the Iraqi government to support the Iraqi army. Date: 07.28.2009 Posted: 08.07.2009
Marines with Engineer Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Maintenance Company, 2nd Supply Battalion Reinforced, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), sort captured enemy weapons at the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, July 28. The depot is responsible for destroying unserviceable weapons and turning over serviceable weapons to the Iraqi government to support the Iraqi army. Date: 07.28.2009 Posted: 08.07.2009

More photos below:

Marines with Engineer Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Maintenance Company, 2nd Supply Battalion Reinforced, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), stand in line to report serial numbers of captured enemy weapons at the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, July 28. The depot is responsible for destroying unserviceable weapons and turning over serviceable weapons to the Iraqi government to support the Iraqi army. Photo by Cpl. M. M. Bravo   Date: 07.28.2009 Posted: 08.07.2009
Marines with Engineer Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Maintenance Company, 2nd Supply Battalion Reinforced, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward), stand in line to report serial numbers of captured enemy weapons at the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, July 28. The depot is responsible for destroying unserviceable weapons and turning over serviceable weapons to the Iraqi government to support the Iraqi army. Photo by Cpl. M. M. Bravo Date: 07.28.2009 Posted: 08.07.2009
Unserviceable captured enemy weapons delivered by Marines with Engineer Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Maintenance Company, 2nd Supply Battalion Reinforced, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward) to the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, lay in a pile waiting to be destroyed, July 28. The depot is responsible for destroying unserviceable weapons and turning over serviceable weapons to the Iraqi government to support the Iraqi army. Photo by Cpl. M. M. Bravo   Date: 07.28.2009 Posted: 08.07.2009
Unserviceable captured enemy weapons delivered by Marines with Engineer Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Maintenance Company, 2nd Supply Battalion Reinforced, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (Forward) to the Taji National Maintenance Depot aboard Camp Taji, Iraq, lay in a pile waiting to be destroyed, July 28. The depot is responsible for destroying unserviceable weapons and turning over serviceable weapons to the Iraqi government to support the Iraqi army. Photo by Cpl. M. M. Bravo Date: 07.28.2009 Posted: 08.07.2009

11 thoughts on “Captured Weapons”

  1. Wow. Just looking at the first photo I actually want to go there and dig through this pile of guns, purely out of historic interest. Some of this stuff isn’t produced anymore!

  2. AUGH! Mausers, Lee-Enfields, and other milsurps galore! I even see a Steyr M95 long rifle in the lower right corner! Those haven’t been made since 1920! To heck with the Iraqi military- send ’em here!

  3. They appear to be MG42’s the one thing I will never understand is people destroying good C&R’s I would be so happy if there was another good wave of historical arms before their gone forever. I wonder what car collectors would say if I found a warehouse full of classic cars and I decided to destroy them. Cars aren’t weapons you say? Well I say a buick skylark is more dangerous than a Lee-Enfield.

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