No knock raid

No Indictment for Shooter in No-Knock Raid

Texas:

A Burleson County Grand Jury declined to indict the man who shot and killed a Burleson County Sheriff’s Deputy who was serving a search warrant in December.

Investigators were executing a search warrant at Henry McGee’s mobile home near Snook when the shooting happened.

A grand jury decided there wasn’t enough evidence for him to stand trial on the capital murder charge.

McGee admitted to shooting Sowders before sunrise on December 19th while the deputy and other investigators were serving a no knock search warrant for drugs at McGee’s mobile home near Snook.

Magee’s Defense Attorney Dick DeGuerin says his client thought someone was breaking into his home and fired to protect his pregnant girlfriend and himself.

McGee remains jailed on felony drug charges.

Via Instapundit, who writes

The dangers of no-knock raids. One of the reasons for the knock-and-announce rule is so that homeowners can assure themselves that their home isn’t being invaded. Sounds like this grand jury did the right thing, but if the sheriff’s department had been more sensible, the deputy would be alive now.