High/Low Technique

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Oct. 27, 2009) Army Sgt. Brad Paxton and Sgt. Tim Brooder, assigned to Superior Training for Superior Response (STSR) and Goose Creek Police Department, provide instruction on how to utilize the high/low technique to maximize spread of fire toward aggressors to students assigned to Naval Weapons Station Charleston. (U.S. Navy photo by Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Juan Pinalez/Released)
CHARLESTON, S.C. (Oct. 27, 2009) Army Sgt. Brad Paxton and Sgt. Tim Brooder, assigned to Superior Training for Superior Response (STSR) and Goose Creek Police Department, provide instruction on how to utilize the high/low technique to maximize spread of fire toward aggressors to students assigned to Naval Weapons Station Charleston. (U.S. Navy photo by Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Juan Pinalez/Released)

Get a load of the rifles they’re using.

Story here: NWS Charleston New Police Officers Complete Tactical Training

Changing Demographics

The thrill of the hunt is still there, but hunting continues to fade

It’s that family tradition of hunting that introduces most people to the sport. And it’s what keeps them coming back.

But in the past few years, the number of people hunting has continued its decade-long decline in South Carolina. As the number of hunters has declined so have sales of shotguns and rifles in the state.

Earlier I posted that South Carolina, like many states, just set a new conceal carry permit record. Something else noted in that story, though, is that the sales of both shotguns and rifles are declining. Last year saw a 9% decline in the number of hunting licenses issued in the state since 1999. Not huge, but it’s a significant number. Background checks for rifles and shotguns in South Carolina have dropped by 18% over the same period. Though transactions between individuals for these guns won’t show up in those numbers, transactions between individuals will be used guns, meaning that the sales of new long guns are down.

It would be interesting to see if rifle sales saw an increase in 2009 due to the great AR Rush. Many of those buying new rifles are not buying them to hunt.

Pizza Guy

Again, a pizza, a robbery, a gunshot

Lexington, South Carolina:

The suspect, Raymond Antonio Metze, 17, of 212 Crestridge Drive, Lexington, was booked Sunday at the Lexington County Detention Center on charges of armed robbery and possessing a weapon during the commission of a violent crime. He is in jail under $100,000 bond.

A black BB pistol that resembled a semiautomatic handgun was used in the robbery, a Sheriff’s Department spokesman said…

According to warrants and reports from deputies, shortly before midnight, the 29-year-old delivery man — from Papa John’s on 3937 Platt Springs Road — brought pizza to 236 Crestridge Drive. The home was vacant.

After the delivery man knocked on the front door, a man came from the side of the house with what appeared to be a handgun and demanded cash.

The pizza delivery man gave him a little more than $200.

As the pizza delivery man left, the suspect kept pointing his fake pistol at him. Not knowing it was fake and only fired BBs, the pizza man pulled his handgun. It was real, a 9mm semiautomatic.

He fired one shot, wounding the suspect in his chest.

No doubt some will wonder whether the shooting was truly necessary, as the pizza guy had handed over the cash and was already trying to leave. Murdoc suspects that the delivery driver no doubt felt threatened and that his life was in danger, and the robber’s gun (though it turned out to be fake) justifies that feeling. Still, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear complaints that the pizza guy’s response “wasn’t proportional” or some such.

Last I heard, Papa John’s has a policy against delivery drivers arming themselves.

Thanks for the heads up to Say Uncle, who wrote

Real gun beats fake gun.

Yep. Almost every time.

23 State Attorneys General To Attorney General Holder: “No Semi-Auto Ban”

Via the NRA-ILA:

On June 11, the top law enforcement officials of nearly half the states signed a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, expressing their opposition to reinstatement of the federal ban on semi-automatic firearms.

“We share the Obama Administration’s commitment to reducing illegal drugs and violent crime within the United States. We also share your deep concern about drug cartel violence in Mexico. However, we do not believe that restricting law-abiding Americans’ access to certain semi-automatic firearms will resolve any of these problems,” the letter said.

The letter notes congressional opposition to bringing back the ban, and calls for increasing enforcement of existing laws.

We encourage NRA members to let these state officials know we appreciate them standing up to the incessant clamor for gun control that is currently coming from anti-gun groups and their media allies.

The 23 state Attorneys General, in alphabetical order, by state, are:
Continue reading 23 State Attorneys General To Attorney General Holder: “No Semi-Auto Ban”

‘A loud message to the criminal element’

Pizza Hut has a "no guns" policy for its deliver drivers. Fortunately, some of them risk their job and ignore it.
Pizza Hut has a 'no guns' policy for its deliver drivers. Fortunately, some of them risk their job and ignore it.

An ambushed pizza guy shot and killed one of four attackers in Columbia, South Carolina:

[Christopher Steven] Miller had a concealed weapons permit and was trying to retreat from his attackers while being beaten by one of them, Metts said. Such a permit allows a person to carry a hidden gun.

Miller carried a .45-caliber Taurus handgun in a fanny pack and took it out and fired while being beaten backward, Metts said. Such large-caliber pistols are known for their “stopping power” — the ability to bring down an attacker instantly.

No weapons were recovered from Sturgill, Metts said.

Metts said Sunday afternoon it appears Miller acted within the law and will not face charges. However, police have made no final decisions and will discuss the incident with prosecutors, he said.

Obviously the article is written as if people reading have little or no understanding about guns or firearms laws, which might be irritating to us but isn’t so bad as long as it’s not unbalanced.

At least one of the attackers apparently has, surprise surprise, gang connections.

Since Miller works for Pizza Hut, which has a company policy against employees carrying weapons for self-defense, he’s probably going to be looking for a job once his broken nose heals.

A lot of folks, including some at Pizza Hut, are going to argue that it’s not worth shooting someone over a few dollars in cash. Except that the pizza guy was retreating and was pursued and beaten. Apparently, the attack was launched pretty quickly. It doesn’t sound like a case where the pizza guy was going to avoid it.

It’s not worth shooting someone over a few bucks
?

How about it’s not worth getting yourself shot over a few bucks? That’s the right way to ask it. You don’t want to risk getting yourself shot? Don’t ambush pizza guys.

I’ve got to credit Sheriff Metts, at least as portrayed in the write-up:

“At this point in time, his (Miller’s) actions look very appropriate,” Metts said, describing them as apparent “self-defense” because Miller was retreating and his assailants continued to attack.

and especially

Metts said that although an investigation will continue, one thing about Miller’s using his weapon is clear:

“This sends a loud message to the criminal element — you don’t know who’s going to be armed and who’s not going to be armed when you go to rob someone.”